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US History

Statistics

  Counts

  Total Pages: 5.26
  Total Words: 1315
  Total Characters: 6556
  Number of Sentences: 71


  Averages

  Words per Sentences: 18.52
  Characters per Words: 4.99


  Readability

  Flesch Reading Ease: 61.43
  Fog Scale Level: 11.76
  Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level: 9.29  

US History

For a country as powerful as the United States, there comes a responsibility to protect its allies, neighbors, and supremely itself.  However, there are times when this sense of responsibility misleads the U.S. into using force that is excessive or unnecessary.  We are walking a fine line of political laissez-faire and obligation to intervene, but add the element of a ¡°Lyndon Johnson¡¯s obsessive fear of the spread of Castro-style communism¡± (Musicant 363), and consequently, we will find ourselves resurrecting gun boat diplomacy and the Monroe Doctrine.  Although under the veil of ensuring safety to our citizens, the invasion of Grenada is an example of where we overstepped our legal bounds, fabricated justifications and reacted without preparation, inconsiderate of the criticism which was definite to follow.
A main concern of the United States was its 1,000 citizens on the island.  Of these citizens, 600 were medical students at St. George University.  Because of the political turmoil, the U.S. stated to its public that the students and citizens on Grenada were in danger.  President Reagan also stated to the press that there was no way for our citizens to get off the island.  However, the State Department had issued a formal note to Grenada asking about the safety of its citizen, to which the minister of external affairs replied, ¡° The interest of the United States citizens are in no way threatened by the present situation ... which the Ministry hastens to point out is a purely internal affair¡±(Musicant 374).  The Chancellor of the school, Charles Modica, was announcing that the students were in no danger, and that the school was expected to continue to have good relations with the ¡°Government¡±  (Weinberger 108).  This display of good will coincided with the report Margaret Thatcher, Britian¡¯s Prime Minister, received from the Deputy High Commissioner in Bridgetown, Barbados, who had visited Grenada,...

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