Moopuna
Site Search:    

Term Papers Categories

Acceptance Essays
Alcohol & Drugs
American History
Anatomy & Physiology
Animal Science
Anthropology
Architecture
Arts
Astronomy
Aviation
Biographies
Biology
Book Reports
Business
Chemistry
Computers & Internet
Creative Writing
Current Events
Economics
Education
Engineering
English
Environmental Issues
Ethics
European History
Film & Cinema
Foreign Languages
Geography
Government
Health & Beauty
Health Care
History
Human Sexuality
Legal Issues
Marketing
Mathematics
Medicine
Movies
Music
Mythology
Philosophy
Physics
Poetry
Political Issues
Political Science
Psychology
Religion
Science
Shakespeare
Social Issues
Sociology
Speech & Communications
Sports & Games
Supernatural Issues
Technology
Theater
World History
Zoology




Essay #4: Jorge Luis Borges

Statistics

  Counts

  Total Pages: 6.39
  Total Words: 1598
  Total Characters: 8572
  Number of Sentences: 61


  Averages

  Words per Sentences: 26.2
  Characters per Words: 5.36


  Readability

  Flesch Reading Ease: 42.7
  Fog Scale Level: 17.29
  Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level: 13.81  

                                    Essay #4: Jorge Luis Borges


                                                                                                            


                                                                                                English 1A                    


In Ficciones, Jorge Luis Borges attempts to skew the fundamental principles by which most people govern their lives. He constructs roughly allegorical worlds that reflect reality in their complexity and scope. By pulling the reader deeper into these labyrinths, Borges’ stories subtly and without mal-intent, demand a reexamination of the way we collectively relate to the world. Specifically, Borges questions the reliability of the past – something by which individuals, ethnicities and nations define themselves. In the first story of the collection, “Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius,” Borges sets the precedent for later stories, by describing a completely fictionalized world that becomes a reality. By writing, “we know nothing about it with any certainty, not even that it is false,” Borges comments on the futility of attempting to determine that something is either true of false, when confronting it through writing. Therefore, the moment an act is recorded, it becomes an entity of its own – neither fact nor fiction. In “Pierre Menard, Author of Don Quixote,” Borges writes, “historical truth, for [Menard], is not what took place; it is what we think took place.” History, as Menard understands it, resists commonplace phraseology like “truth” and “fact” altogether – instead, it becomes merely a widely accepted account of a lost moment in time. In “Theme of the Traitor and the Hero” and “Three Versions of Judas,” Borges presents two individuals struggling with the realization that our present-day conceptions of the past may be inconsistent with the actual truth. By undermining the traditional concepts of hero and traitor, as they are presented in historical and religio...

Please login to view comments from other users.



If you are having problems registering, please don't hesitate to contact us.

© Copyright 1999- Moopuna.com. All Rights Reserved.